Virginia governor urges Trump to condemn bigotry, 32-year-old victim identified

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BEDMINISTER, Nj. (AP) - UPDATE: Sunday 2:45pm
Charlottesville Mayor Mike Signer called the killing of a 32-year-old woman and the injury of others by a vehicle at a rally in the city a "terrorist attack with a car used as a weapon."

He made the comments in an interview Sunday with NBC's "Meet the Press."

Heather Heyer died when a car rammed into a group of people who were protesting the presence of white supremacists who had gathered in the city for a rally.

The car's driver, James Alex Fields Jr. was charged with second-degree murder and other counts.

A friend of Heyer said she's no different than a casualty of war. Felicia Correa said she died standing up for people of color.

Correa said Heyer and other counterprotesters put their lives on the line to confront hateful bigotry.

Vanguard America denies that James Alex Fields Jr. is a member of its group and says it handed out shields to anyone in attendance who wanted them. The Anti-Defamation League says Vanguard America believes the U.S. is an exclusively white nation, and uses propaganda to recruit young white men online and on college campuses. Vanguard America confirmed via Twitter account that members were in Charlottesville on Saturday morning, part of what's believed to be the largest group of white nationalists to come together in a decade, to rally against plans to remove a Confederate statue. Hundreds of others came to protest against the racism.

In the photo, taken by the New York Daily News , Fields stands with a handful of men, all dressed similarly in the usual Vanguard America uniform of khakis and white polo shirts. The men hold white shields with a black-and-white logo of two axes. The Confederate statue of Robert E. Lee is in the background. The Daily News says the photo was taken about 10:30 a.m. Charlottesville officials say the car crashed into the crowd, killing one, at 1:42 p.m.

Meanwhile Virginia Gov. Terry McAuliffe is calling on President Donald Trump to more strongly condemn the bigotry and violence that happened in Charlottesville, Virginia, this weekend.

Democrat McAuliffe told reporters at First Baptist Church in Charlottesville on Sunday that angry political rhetoric needs to stop.

Sunday afternoon, the man who organized a rally in Charlottesville that sparked violent clashes between white supremacist groups and counter-protesters tried to hold a news conference a day after the deadly event, but a crowd of several hundred booed him and forced him away from the lectern.

Jason Kessler is a blogger based in Charlottesville, and as he came out to speak Sunday afternoon near City Hall, he was surrounded by cameras and people. Some people chanted and made noises with drums and other instruments. Among the chants: "You're wearing the wrong hood," a reference to the Ku Klux Klan.

Kessler mimicked looking at his watch and indicated he'd wait to speak.

A few people approached, crossing the line of TV cameras. One man pushed Kessler. A woman tackled him.

Kessler asked state troopers on the scene for help. Eventually they escorted him off. State police say troopers approached the area as the crowd got aggressive but made no arrests.

Federal law enforcement authorities said late Saturday a civil rights investigation is underway. The FBI said that it is collecting facts and evidence in an ongoing investigation.

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Hospital official says one dead, 19 injured after car plows into a group of protesters in downtown Charlottesville.

President Donald Trump responded to today events from New Jersey, saying there's "no place" in the United States for the kind of violence that's broken out at a white nationalist rally in Virginia.

Disturbances began Friday night during a march through the University of Virginia. Saturday's clashes between white nationalists and counter-protesters have grown so violent the governor has declared a state of emergency and police have ordered people to disperse.

Trump has tweeted that "we ALL must be united & condemn all that hate stands for." He also says "there is no place for this kind of violence in America. Lets come together as one!"

The White House was silent for hours except for a tweet from first lady Melania Trump -- "Our country encourages freedom of speech, but let's communicate w/o hate in our hearts."

Gov. Terry McAuliffe said via his Twitter account on Saturday morning that the declaration was made in order "to aid state response to violence" at the rally in Charlottesville, about 100 miles outside of Washington, D.C.

It's the latest confrontation in the city since it voted earlier this year to remove a statue of Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee from a downtown park.

The city's manager also declared a local emergency and police ordered people to disperse from the area around the statue after several violent clashes broke out.