1011Now | Lincoln, Grand Island, Nebraska | News, Weather, Sports

Health Experts Worry About an Even Worse Flu Outbreak

By: Chris Hunt
By: Chris Hunt

"It will happen, it's a matter of when it happens," predicts Health and Human Services health expert Chris Newlon.

She has worked with health departments in Nebraska for years, tracking communicable diseases. She and many other health experts are watching for a new pandemic of flu.

"This year there appears to have been a more significant change (in the virus), we talk a lot about the potential for a pandemic outbreak," she adds.

Influenza is a virus, which is a life form. And viruses can mutate, sometimes rapidly. A strain of flu can often be identified early in its life cycle. That's how flu vaccines are developed. But when a pandemic occurs, vaccines are difficult if not impossible to make in time. The virus has mutated so fast scientists can't keep up with it.

There have been three pandemics of flu in the last Century. The last pandemic was known as "Hong Kong" flu and hit in 1968-69. It killed 34,000 Americans. An outbreak in 1957-58 was called "Asian flu" and killed 70,000 Americans. But the worst pandemic was the "Spanish flu" in 1918-19.

The "Spanish flu" is still a mystery to scientists. They don't know where it came from or why it died off. Researchers were able to find the origins of the other pandemics. Its believed Spanish flu mutated from swine flu. But some worry the "Spanish flu" is still out there, waiting to strike.

It had other odd characteristics. Flu usually kills infants and the elderly. But Spanish flu almost seemed to deliberately target young, healthy adults. The virus was deadly, killing most people in 48 hours by bringing on pneumonia and other complications.

kolnkgin.com Extended Web Coverage

Influenza (the flu)
Influenza, also known as the flu, is a contagious disease that is caused by the influenza virus. It attacks the respiratory tract in humans (nose, throat, and lungs). The flu is different from a cold. Influenza usually comes on suddenly and may include these symptoms:

  • Fever
  • Headache
  • Tiredness (can be extreme)
  • Dry cough
  • Sore throat
  • Nasal congestion
  • Body aches

    These symptoms are usually referred to as "flu-like symptoms."

    Anyone Can Get the Flu, But the Disease Is More Severe for Some People

    Most people who get influenza will recover in one to two weeks, but some people will develop life-threatening complications (such as pneumonia) as a result of the flu. Millions of people in the United States, about 10% to 20% of U.S. residents, will get influenza each year. An average of about 36,000 people per year in the United States die from influenza, and 114,000 per year have to be admitted to the hospital as a result of influenza. Anyone can get the flu (even healthy people), and serious problems from influenza can happen at any age. People age 65 years and older, people of any age with chronic medical conditions, and very young children are more likely to get complications from influenza. Pneumonia, bronchitis, and sinus and ear infections are three examples of complications from flu. The flu can make chronic health problems worse. For example, people with asthma may experience asthma attacks while they have the flu, and people with chronic congestive heart failure may have worsening of this condition that is triggered by the flu.

    How the Influenza Virus Is Passed Around

    The flu is spread, or transmitted, when a person who has the flu coughs, sneezes, or speaks and sends flu virus into the air, and other people inhale the virus. The virus enters the nose, throat, or lungs of a person and begins to multiply, causing symptoms of influenza. Influenza may, less often, be spread when a person touches a surface that has flu viruses on it – a door handle, for instance – and then touches his or her nose or mouth.

    The Flu Is Contagious

    A person can spread the flu starting one day before he or she feels sick. Adults can continue to pass the flu virus to others for another three to seven days after symptoms start. Children can pass the virus for longer than seven days. Symptoms start one to four days after the virus enters the body. Some persons can be infected with the flu virus but have no symptoms. During this time, those persons can still spread the virus to others.

    How To Know if You Have the Flu

    Your respiratory illness might be the flu if you have sudden onset of body aches, fever, and respiratory symptoms, and your illness occurs during November through April (the usual flu season in the Northern Hemisphere). However, during this time, other respiratory illnesses can cause similar symptoms and flu can be caught at any time of the year. It is impossible to tell for sure if you have the flu based on symptoms alone. Doctors can perform tests to see if you have the flu if you are in the first few days of your illness.

    What You Should Do If You Get the Flu

  • Rest
  • Drink plenty of liquids
  • Avoid using alcohol and tobacco
  • Take medication to relieve the symptoms of flu

    Influenza is caused by a virus, so antibiotics (like penicillin) don’t work to cure it. The best way to prevent the flu is to get an influenza vaccine (flu shot) each fall, before flu season.

    Do Not Give Aspirin To a Child or Teenager Who Has the Flu

    Never give aspirin to children or teenagers who have flu-like symptoms – and particularly fever – without first speaking to your doctor. Giving aspirin to children and teenagers who have influenza can cause a rare but serious illness called Reye syndrome. Children or teenagers with the flu should get plenty of rest, drink lots of liquids, and take medicines that contain no aspirin to relieve symptoms.

    The Myth of the "Stomach Flu”

    Many people use the term "stomach flu” to describe illnesses with nausea, vomiting, or diarrhea. These symptoms can be caused by many different viruses, bacteria, or even parasites. While vomiting, diarrhea, and being nauseous or “sick to your stomach” can sometimes be related to the flu — particularly in children — these problems are rarely the main symptoms of influenza. The flu is a respiratory disease and not a stomach or intestinal disease.

    Weekly Flu Update: http://www.cdc.gov/ncidod/diseases/flu/weekly.htm

    Source: http://www.cdc.gov (Center of Disease Control Web site) contributed to this report.


  • KOLN-TV Call: (402) 467-4321 Toll-free: 1-800-475-1011 840 North 40th Lincoln, NE 68503 Email: info@1011now.com KGIN-TV Call: (308) 382-6100 123 N Locust Street Grand Island, NE 68802 Email: kgin@1011now.com KSNB-TV Toll free 888-475-1011 123 N. Locust St. Grand Island, NE 68802 Email : ksnb@1011now.com
    Gray Television, Inc. - Copyright © 2002-2014 - Designed by Gray Digital Media - Powered by Clickability 539912 - 1011now.com/a?a=539912