Advisory committee recommends two new high schools in Lincoln

Lincoln East High School is one of several LPS schools experiencing overcrowding. Right now, it's at 129-percent capacity. (Source: KOLN)
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LINCOLN, Neb. -- The Lincoln Public Schools Superintendent’s Facility Advisory Committee released its preliminary recommendations on new facilities and finances Tuesday, which includes the building of two new high schools and multiple elementary schools.

The preliminary report from the committee recommends LPS propose a bond issue that ranges from $250-$290 million sometime in 2020. The committee said it could ask for a bond, without increasing the 16.1 cent levy rate, thus not raising taxes.

"I can guarantee you that the recommendations tonight, when you add up all the dollars associated with them, it will be a number that is larger than the likely bond issue,” said committee co-leader, Nick Cusick.

The committee, which is broken down into six subcommittees, had several specific recommendations.

"Our goal is to build a consensus that we can forward to the superintendent and then ultimately the school board to kind of inform whats going on, what LPS should do about its facility needs,” said Cusick.

The report recommends the building of two new high schools, with each high school starting at about 1,000 students and room to grow to 2,000 students. The schools would likely be in northwest Lincoln and southeast Lincoln.

Here is an interactive map of undeveloped sites owned by Lincoln Publid Schools, with note on how they could potentially fit recommendations from the 2019 Preliminary Plan for new school facilities by the Superintendent's Facility Advisory Committee.


Multiple new elementary schools are being recommended by the committee, including two first-of-their kind Kindergarten through 8th Grade schools. The plan also highlights a need for new sporting facilities that accompany the new high schools.

Also, the committee recommends improvements to athletic facilities at each of the existing high schools to “create equity and address needs.” It said it could save up to $4 million by not building "stand alone" facilities.

The report also addresses focus programs, including a potential Aviation Focus Program partnering with Duncan Aviation, and the need for more early childhood education classrooms.

The report is not final. The committee will meet again in June, with a goal of having a final recommendation ready for the Lincoln School Board by late August.

To read the full report, click here.