Carry the Load campaign passes through Lincoln

LINCOLN, Neb. 3,900 miles over 32 days, that’s how far a group honoring fallen first responders and veterans is carrying an American flag.

Wednesday, a group honoring fallen first responders and veterans passed through Lincoln as part of their 3,900 mile journey ending in Dallas on Memorial Day. (Source: KOLN)

The Carry the Load campaign started its journey in Minneapolis and will end with a rally in Dallas on Memorial Day.

Wednesday, the flag and the group passed through Lincoln.

A group of supporters and veterans continue to carry the flag and the memories of those lost during their time on the front lines.

“I’ll be honest, the past couple of days have been rainy but the turnouts been really good,” said Kyle Lund, a veteran and member of the group. “We almost prefer to walk in really bad weather, because anybody who has ever worn a uniform, they’ve been on worse walks than that.”

Kyle Lund served in the U.S. Army. He was deployed to Iraq twice, where he lost many who were fighting alongside him.

“We had right around 18 members who were killed in action,” said Lund. “Many dozens more who were sent home from their injuries so I have a lot of people that I carry with me personally so it definitely has a special meaning to me in that regard.”

Their bus is a moving museum. Filled with mementos, photos and notes given to the group from those who wanted a piece of their lost loved one to make it all the way to Dallas.

For Lund, a bracelet is one that’s especially important.

“This one veteran, he was also in the Army, he lost a really close friend of his and he was wearing this bracelet,” said Lund. “He handed it to me and he asked me if I would wear it and take it all the way to Dallas and finish the march. That was really touching to me.”

2019 marks the first time there has been a Midwest march. The group is now entering the home stretch of their 3,900 mile journey. As they continue to spread their message of the true meaning of Memorial Day.

“To be able to keep their memory alive, to speak their name and share their stories, it keeps them from perishing forever,” said Lund.