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Reaction to Trump immigration order

(KWTX)
Published: Jan. 28, 2017 at 8:19 PM CST
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Google, Apple and other tech giants are expressing dismay over an executive order on immigration from President Donald Trump that bars nationals of seven Muslim-majority countries from entering the U.S.

The U.S tech industry relies on foreign engineers and other technical experts for a sizeable percentage of its workforce. The order bars entry to the U.S. for anyone from Iran, Iraq, Libya, Somalia, Sudan, Syria and Yemen for 90 days.

The move, ostensibly intended to prevent extremists from carrying out attacks in the U.S., could now also heighten tensions between the new Trump administration and one of the nation's most economically and culturally important industries. That's especially true if Trump goes on to revamp the industry's temporary worker permits known as H-1B visas, as some fear.

Apple CEO Tim Cook wrote in a memo to employees that "We have reached out to the White House to explain the negative effect on our coworkers and our company."

Nebraska Senator Ben Sasse also issued the following statement on border security and Muslim nations.

"The President is right to focus attention on the obvious fact that borders matter. At the same time, while not technically a Muslim ban, this order is too broad. There are two ways to lose our generational battle against jihadism by losing touch with reality. The first is to keep pretending that jihadi terrorism has no connection to Islam or to certain countries. That’s been a disaster. And here's the second way to fail: If we send a signal to the Middle East that the U.S. sees all Muslims as jihadis, the terrorist recruiters win by telling kids that America is banning Muslims and that this is America versus one religion. Both approaches are wrong, and both will make us less safe. Our generational fight against jihadism requires wisdom."

Protesters gathered in cities across the United States on Saturday to complain about President Donald Trump's immigration policies, with more protests scheduled for Sunday.

This was the second weekend of demonstrations across the nation, with more than 1 million people coming out last weekend for the Women's March.

A large crowd massed at John F. Kennedy International Airport in New York to protest the detention of two Iraqis.

"Mr. President, look at us," said US Rep. Nydia Velazquez, a New York Democrat. "This is America. What you have done is shameful. It's un-American. And it's created so much confusion, not only among working families and families in America, but also it's creating confusion with the people that are working in homeland security."

One of the detained men, Hameed Khalid Darweesh, was released early Saturday afternoon. He worked with the US government for 10 years after the United States invaded Iraq.

The other detained man, Haider Sameer Abdulkaleq Alshawi, had been granted a visa to join his wife, who worked for a US contractor in Iraq, and son, both of whom already live in the United States as refugees. Alshawi was expected to be released later Saturday.

Rep. Jerrold Nadler, another Democrat from New York, said 10 other travelers were detained, but their status was unclear Saturday night.

The protesters gathered in Terminal 4 at JFK and carried signs reading, "We are all immigrants!" and "No ban! No wall!"

The New York Taxi Workers Alliance has asked drivers not to pick up passengers at JFK in support of the protest.

A group of community activists, attorneys and others gathered at O'Hare International Airport in Chicago.

Protests also took place at Dulles International Airport in Washington; Newark International Airport in New Jersey; San Francisco; Denver and Dallas.

Protests are scheduled Sunday in Orlando, Boston, Philadelphia, Atlanta, Seattle, Washington and Chicago, mostly at airports.

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