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Talking about recent Black Lives Matter protests with kids in Lincoln

This picture was drawn by 12-year-old Adaline Nolte, depicting what she believes is sending a message about the Black Lives Matter movement. (SOURCE: KOLN)
This picture was drawn by 12-year-old Adaline Nolte, depicting what she believes is sending a message about the Black Lives Matter movement. (SOURCE: KOLN)(KOLNKGIN)
Published: Jun. 11, 2020 at 6:38 AM CDT
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In light of nationwide protests, some parents are having conversations with their kids about topics like racism and police brutality, and it may be uncomfortable for some.

A few nights ago, Robin Nolte woke up to find a drawing sitting on her kitchen table. It was a picture drawn by her 12-year-old daughter Adaline, depicting what she believes is sending a message about the Black Lives Matter movement.

Less than two weeks ago, Nolte found herself in downtown Lincoln, protesting for the Black Lives Matter movement.

After coming home from being tear gassed, she knew she needed to shift conversations with her kids about recent events taking place.

Psychologists say being transparent and honest with your kids about what you know and don't know is important.

Nolte says this has always been her approach when talking to her kids about racism.

So, a few nights ago, she gathered her kids around the table and had an important conversation following the death of George Floyd.

For this mom, being silent about these issues has never been an option.

"I think it's important to have the conversation because it's never going to get shoved under the rug, even if we don't talk about it. The conversation between their friends and in their minds is going to be there the whole time. So, if I don't talk to them, then they will assume things that aren't true," Nolte says.

Nolte has always made sure her kids are aware of cultural differences. From living in different states, to attending diverse schools, conversations about race seem to come up often in the Nolte family.

With recent protests, her kids have been receiving their information firsthand through social media. That's why Nolte knew she wanted to be honest and understanding about how her kids feel on these topics, "I started it with them, explaining to me what they knew, and then, we could talk through it. I didn't want to tell them they were wrong because they're not wrong. Their opinions aren't wrong, especially when they're formed on incorrect facts."

Nolte tells 10/11 she allows her kids to ask questions and have discussions, so they can be informed about racial inequality and to understand why protests are happening.

Psychologists recommend parents watch where their kids are getting access to information and talk about what they see. They also suggest parents keep an open mind.

Nolte has decided to include her kids in a peaceful march happening in Lincoln on June 19, 2020, where they're volunteering to hand out water to protesters.

To help parents spark conversations about racism, protests and police violence with their kids, here are some

on those topics.

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